Tuesday, May 17, 2011

The Dark Forest

This drabble was inspired by two separate challenges on the Holy Worlds Christian Fantasy Forum. One was a challenge to write a story from a single picture, and I chose Dieki Kondrael's "Magical Forest", which can be seen below. The other was Aubrey Hansen's challenge to write a story from a single Bible verse, and I chose 2 Corinthians 11:14 (NIV): Satan himself masquerades as an angel of light.


To see more of Dieki Kondrael's art, visit http://www.diekisdreamings.com/


After an hour, Mateo stopped searching for the path. He was lost in the dark forest.

He held back tears. The monastery would send a monk to find their favorite foolish boy.

Suddenly floating dots of light appeared and danced around him.

Fireflies?

Fairies?

Warm and happy feelings made him drowsy.

He lay down on the ground, surrendering.

“Never sleep in the forest,” the monks had warned. “Evil dwells there.”

He yawned and blinked.

Could the lights be evil?

“Jesus,” he whispered sleepily.

The lights floated backwards.

He stood up.

“Jesus.”

The lights fled.

Looking down, he saw the path.


(c) 2011 Jonathan Garner

12 comments:

  1. Nice work; goes well with the picture and the verse.

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  2. Goes wonderfully with the picture, and has a layer of suspense hanging over it as well. Nice work.

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  3. Thanks! I enjoyed being able to fuse the inspiration from both a picture and a Bible verse into one story.

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  4. Very well done. The others are right, it fits perfectly with Dieki's picture. It pertains slightly to every day living too. Good job! :)

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  5. Thank you, BushMaid! The theme definitely is applicable in every day life, too.

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  6. Cool story, and it's elixer again by the way. So this will be a novel? 'Cause I can't wait to read it!

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  7. Thanks, Elixer! I don't have any plans to turn it into a novel at this point, but it's possible. :)

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  8. I really like this story, Jonathan! It's spare, and in that kind of spare prose, things stand out, like: "The monastery would send a monk to find their favorite foolish boy."
    You also truly met both challenges.

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  9. Thank you, Mrs. Tatham! I'm glad you noticed that line, for it was one of the lines I worked hardest on.

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