Thursday, September 27, 2012

Anastasia (1956)



After the royal family is killed during the Russian revolution, no one can access the family's $10 million in a British bank. However, an exiled general sets out to change that by using a woman who greatly resembles the royal daughter, Anastasia, to claim that the heir to the fortune is still alive and access the money. The woman suffers from mental illness, and is reluctant to go along with the plan, but eventually agrees to. Together, they set out to convince the world, and more importantly, the real Anastasia’s aunt, that the woman is the real Anastasia, so they can claim the millions of dollars for themselves.

The story and characters in Anastasia are well done, though it seemed like the film could have benefited from being a bit longer, to give it more time to focus on certain aspects of the story and characters. The theme of being true to yourself rather than doing whatever it takes to chase money was nothing new but fairly effective. The acting is, as one would expect, quite good. In the end, this is a competently made but not particularly memorable historical drama.

Content is generally mild: Intensity, such as thoughts of suicide and references to mental illness and murder. A middle-aged woman’s lustful ways are condemned, but more due to her age than the immorality itself. There is a bit of kissing. The main characters are almost all shady in some way, and it is not evident at the end if the two protagonists have learned better in general, though they do learn the error of some of their ways.


(c) 2012 Jonathan Garner

4 comments:

  1. Sounds interesting. This is on instant streaming Netflix, so I might watch it sometime.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Let me know what you think, if you do. Thank you for commenting, Grace!

      Delete
  2. Shockingly, I have not seen this, which is odd because I adored the animated movie as a child (though I look back at it now and think it was rather creepy). I will have to look into watching this one. :D Thanks, Jonathan!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for commenting, Kaitlyn! If you watch it, let me know what you think.

      Delete